Lately one high/low hack has been popping up everywhere we look: using bits and pieces of discarded or leftover marble around the house for a luxe look on a budget. Case in point: When we wrote about this Two-Week, $1,000, 500-Square-Foot Rental Overhaul in Bushwick, Brooklyn, design student Kristina Line revealed that she scoured nearby marble scrap yards for unwanted pieces to create shelving and backsplashes in her DIY apartment; the restauranteurs behind the design-forward Portuguese wine bar Cervo’s did the same for the restaurant’s statement-making front counter. And when we looked back over the archives for more ideas for using marble odds and ends we found, among many ideas, some expert encouragement from Anthony D’Argenzio of New York City creative agency Zio & Sons: “Marble can be turned into trim around backsplashes, thresholds, door saddles. It can be cut, so it’s more versatile than tile,” he told us in Expert Advice: What to Source from Salvage.

Head to your local marble yard or retailer and see if they’ll give you discarded pieces for free or at a discount, or use the odds and ends left over from a remodeling project. Even the smallest, scrappiest pieces can be repurposed. Here are 14 ways of using marble scraps to great effect—from small, simple hacks to architectural ideas.

1. Prop up bookends.

Above: Marble scraps as bookends in Done/Undone with Clarisse Demory in Paris.

2. Turn a radiator into a sideboard.

Top radiators with thin marble pieces to create an instant sideboard or place for display, as seen in An Artfully Appointed Parisian Flat.
Above: Top radiators with thin marble pieces to create an instant sideboard or place for display, as seen in An Artfully Appointed Parisian Flat.

3. Create an ad-hoc backsplash.

In her Two-Week, $data-src=
Above: In her Two-Week, $1,000, 500-Square-Foot Rental Overhaul in Bushwick, Brooklyn, design student Kristina Line sourced discarded marble scraps from a nearby stonemason. Among them: a jagged piece repurposed as a sculptural backsplash in the kitchen. “They don’t see the beauty in the broken leftovers, or what in their eyes is trash,” says her partner, Anton Bak.

4. Frame a sink.

Here&#8
Above: Here’s an example of a marble-remnant backsplash that has a more finished look. In Fabr Studio’s office kitchen, a slab of marble, left over from a kitchen project, serves as oversized backsplash. See Kitchen of the Week: An Architecture Firm’s Own DIY Kitchen in Williamsburg, Ikea Hacks Included.

5. Mount open shelving.

 A practical use for multiple small scraps: open kitchen shelving (supported by sturdy brackets), as seen in A Historical Hudson, NY, Home Reimagined (European Antiques Included).
Above: A practical use for multiple small scraps: open kitchen shelving (supported by sturdy brackets), as seen in A Historical Hudson, NY, Home Reimagined (European Antiques Included).

6. Install a scrap-marble ledge.

Another artful shelf/counter: The statement marble ledge in the front window of NYC wine bar Cervo&#8
Above: Another artful shelf/counter: The statement marble ledge in the front window of NYC wine bar Cervo’s started as a discarded piece at a marble yard in Greenpoint, Brooklyn. “They have lots of scrap pieces left over from bigger jobs,” the owners say. “We spent a couple days going through all these marble scrap yards looking for one that would work with the rest of the color palette.” For a full tour of the interiors, see Cervo’s: 15 Design Ideas to Steal from a Tiny Portuguese Wine Bar in Manhattan.



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PAUL WALKER

PAUL WALKER

Lonely traveler, l like to explore with my camera and my laptop every part of the earth.