One the eve of Valentine’s Day, we asked our experts from the Remodelista Architect and Designer Directory for their go-to “millennial pink” paints. Their picks range from sweet and subtle to downright seductive, and neutral enough to look at year-round. Here are their favorites.

Photography by Mel Walbridge.

(N.B.: Featured photograph, above, by Justine Hand for Remodelista, from Cape Cod Summer Bedrooms Refreshed with Farrow & Ball Paint.)

The full range of pinks.
Above: The full range of pinks.
 Kriste Michelini of California firm Kriste Michelini Interiors recommends Benjamin Moore&#8
Above: Kriste Michelini of California firm Kriste Michelini Interiors recommends Benjamin Moore’s Bridal Pink, with peachy tones.
For pink in &#8
Above: For pink in “subtle tones,” San Francisco–based Medium Plenty chooses Farrow & Ball’s Peignoir. (It’s also the color that Justine chose for her daughter’s bedroom; see picture at top.)
Santa Monica-based MLK Studio opts for Calamine from Farrow & Ball.
Above: Santa Monica-based MLK Studio opts for Calamine from Farrow & Ball.

Also recommended by Kriste Michelini: soft Touch of Pink by Benjamin Moore.
Above: Also recommended by Kriste Michelini: soft Touch of Pink by Benjamin Moore.
 Ellen Hamilton of Hamilton Design Associates prefers Wild Aster from Benjamin Moore.
Above: Ellen Hamilton of Hamilton Design Associates prefers Wild Aster from Benjamin Moore.
 Both LA-based Nickey Kehoe and Lauren Geremia of Bay Area–based Geremia Design named Farrow & Ball’s Pink Ground as their favorite go-to &#8
Above: Both LA-based Nickey Kehoe and Lauren Geremia of Bay Area–based Geremia Design named Farrow & Ball’s Pink Ground as their favorite go-to “millennial pink.”
Jayne Michaels of New York City–based firm
Above: Jayne Michaels of New York City–based firm 2 Michaels opts for Farrow & Ball’s Setting Plaster: “The pigments are earthy, smudgy, and warm, without a hint of sweetness,” she says.
 Brooklyn firm Made has devised a favorite custom pink: a coat of Seashell low-sheen paint by Australian company Sydney Harbour, topped with a coat of their French Wash, which creates a mottled patina look.
Above: Brooklyn firm Made has devised a favorite custom pink: a coat of Seashell low-sheen paint by Australian company Sydney Harbour, topped with a coat of their French Wash, which creates a mottled patina look.
Another, more rosy, choice from Medium Plenty: Cinder Rose by Farrow & Ball.
Above: Another, more rosy, choice from Medium Plenty: Cinder Rose by Farrow & Ball.

Jon Call of Mr. Call Designs in New York City likes Valspar’s Pale Satin Peach, adding, “Fresh pinks like this bring a flush to the face and warmth to a room.”
Above: Jon Call of Mr. Call Designs in New York City likes Valspar’s Pale Satin Peach, adding, “Fresh pinks like this bring a flush to the face and warmth to a room.”
Marysia Rybock of Scavullo Design recommends Benjamin Moore&#8
Above: Marysia Rybock of Scavullo Design recommends Benjamin Moore’s Southern Charm. “I actually used this in my own bedroom several years ago,” she says. “Soft pink with a beige undertone. Very classic looking.”

And finally, the brightest of the picks: Michael Howell of Howells Architecture & Design in Portland, Oregon, suggests Benjamin Moore’s Coral Reef. A little bit of this shade goes a long way; consider using it as an unexpected accent, rather than a full wall.
Above: And finally, the brightest of the picks: Michael Howell of Howells Architecture & Design in Portland, Oregon, suggests Benjamin Moore’s Coral Reef. A little bit of this shade goes a long way; consider using it as an unexpected accent, rather than a full wall.

Not pictured: Marie Fisher Interior Design uses Rose Pále from Les Couleurs’ Le Corbusier collection of pigments.

For more on our top paint picks, head to our Palette & Paints tag page. And for more pink palettes, see:



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PAUL WALKER

PAUL WALKER

Lonely traveler, l like to explore with my camera and my laptop every part of the earth.
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